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In just a few minutes, you can learn to improve your ability to be understood by 40% or more, even in noisy situations. It takes a little practice—but it works!

It takes talking slightly slower with a little more precise pronunciation, with a little more volume, and frequent pauses between key phrases. By speaking more slowly and pausing between key phrases, your listener has a little more time to process what has been said. Speaking with a little more volume means exactly that—a little more volume, not shouting.

Let’s take a sentence as an example:

“My wife’s sister from Oklahoma is coming to visit us in December.”

If that sentence was said, word for word with no pauses, it would be much more difficult to understand than if the words were placed in meaningful phrases such as:

“My wife’s sister (pause) from Oklahoma (pause) is coming to visit us (pause) in December.”

Another example is:

“For dinner on Sunday, we had fried chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, tasty green beans, home-made rolls with butter and ice cream.”

All of that information bunched together in one long phrase could be difficult to follow for someone with a hearing problem. However, if it were spoken more slowly, with a little more precise pronunciation, with a little more volume, and frequent pauses between key phrases, your listener would have an easier time processing the information.

Here’s what it would look like:

“For dinner on Sunday (pause) we had fried chicken (pause) mashed potatoes and gravy (pause) tasty green beans (pause) home-made rolls (pause) with butter (pause) and ice cream.”

You might say it would take you longer to talk with them; however, by following this approach, you would not have to repeat as frequently. You both would feel more relaxed and comfortable.

The pauses should not be so long that they disrupt the natural flow of the conversation, but just long enough to give the listeners a chance to process what is said. These pauses really help the listeners in noisy situations. In the sentence above, the listener may have be busy trying so much to understand “Sunday” and “chicken” that they have a hard time tuning into the last part of the sentence—so they miss almost everything.

Another very important approach is to be sure you and the listener are looking at each other. The visual communication makes the auditory communication much easier.

Often it is assumed that a hearing aid will improve hearing to 100%, however, that may not be true. At Denver Hearing Aids we recognize that the way people speak affects how well someone hears.
For more information and other suggestions, contact Denver Hearing Aids for a FREE CONSULTATION that includes a hearing check, a discussion of your hearing problems, and a demonstration of appropriate amplification in a relaxed atmosphere.

You can call us at 720-335-5134.

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